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This is the end…

After over 70,000 blog views in 113 countries, visiting 21 countries over 15 months and quite a few memories along the way, the time has come and our travels have ended. We’ve now been back in London for about a month and we’re depressed, bemused and discombobulated. It’s cold…too cold…far too cold.

It’s hard to put into words how much fun we have had. It’s also hard to pick out specific highlights. Lots of people have already asked us ‘what’s your favourite country’, and it’s really difficult to choose one over another.

So we thought we would write a quick summary of everywhere we have been and talk about what we liked and didn’t like. So here goes…

Beijing Tapas

Beijing Tapas

01 – China

Our first stop and still one of our favourite countries, China was an amazing place to begin our trip. We found it an easy place to get around with a very good train network. The people can take some getting used to, especially the constant spitting and coughing but on the whole they were friendly and very interesting to watch. Probably the highlight of China was the food, specifically dumplings, hot and sour soup, Peking duck and schezuan food. The Drum and Gong on a tiny hutong in northern Beijing provided us with the best food of our whole trip, hands down.

Hong Kong Peak

Hong Kong Peak

02 – Hong Kong

In Hong Kong we were treated to some lavish accommodation and wild nights out courtesy of Dave, Shiona and friends. With Katy as my guide we squeezed a lot into our two weeks there. It’s probably not the most accessible place for a traveller due to the cost of everything, but we both really enjoyed our time there. Even though it is a fairly small space, there is so much to do there outside of Central. You definitely need to explore to get the best out of Hong Kong.

Ha Long Bay

Ha Long Bay

03- Vietnam

Vietnam was by far the cheapest country we visited on our trip, and very easy to get around. Ha Long Bay was one of the highlights of our entire time away, and even though it is one of the ‘Wonders of the World’, it was peaceful and serene without hoards of people elbowing you out of the way. I was very ill in Saigon, and we had to miss out Hoi An and Huế due to flooding which was a shame. It was interesting to learn more about the ‘American War’ and visit the Cu Chi tunnels…especially when Katy got stuck in the hole.

Buddha heads, Bayon Temple

Buddha heads, Bayon Temple

04 – Cambodia

One of our favourite countries, and I’m still trying to persuade Katy to buy a hostel here. Hot, humid and packed with culture, great food and friendly people. The coast (if you avoid Sihanoukville) is idyllic and somewhere we would both love to visit again (to look for hostel locations). Bus journeys are an experience here, but we got what we paid for. We have mixed feelings over Angkor Wat, we loved climbing over all the ancient temples, playing with the local children and listening to them counting to 10 in about 5 different languages. It’s just a shame we couldn’t have had the place to ourselves for the day.

Road obstructions

Road obstructions

05 – Laos

Our most adventurous and unforgettable country of the trip saw us zip wiring through the jungle, tubing down rivers and motor biking for the very first time through the remote southern region. We had some travel partners in Seb and Sophie, who helped us see in the new year at a Laos bowling alley after bumping into them on a hellish bus journey. The transport and ‘Laos time’ was probably our biggest challenge but taught us how to be more patient. Our favourite Laos dish was the Laap, a spicy minced beef or lamb salad packed with fresh coriander and chilli…delicious. Laos is a fantastic country; cheap, beautiful and very friendly.

Bagan

Bagan

06 – Myanmar

Probably my favourite country of our trip, Myanmar is so different to everywhere else we visited. There is no western influence there at all, so no Coca Cola, Malboro etc…anywhere to be seen and that just added to it for me. It has a huge Indian influence, so eating biryani from a coconut leaf with your hands is all part of the experience. It’s a tiring place to travel around with a very bad and uncomfortable bus network, but it’s all worth the effort. Bagan is just the most amazing place I have ever been, and with so few tourists, visiting it almost feels like you have the place to yourself.

Koh Lanta

Koh Lanta

07 – Thailand

We spent just over 6 weeks in Thailand, 3 of which were spent on a beach on the beautiful island of Koh Lanta where we got to recharge our batteries. The food was a real highlight for us, especially the massaman, green and red curries. We liked the food so much that we took a second Thai cooking lessons whilst we were there. We learnt how to scuba dive which was amazing and also got to play with real life Tigers. Bangkok was hectic, expensive but great fun, especially when we met up with Dave and the HK football lads.

Petronas twin towers

Petronas twin towers

08 – Malaysia

Our highlight of Malaysia has to be the food. From the amazing tikkas and curries in Penang to the cream teas in the Cameron Highlands. We definitely indulged. The Grand Prix in Kuala Lumpur was a wash out but a great experience, and the music festival although fun was disappointing. We got to visit my Mum’s old school (now an army base) and found some photos of her in a local tea room. We didn’t have enough time in Malaysia which meant we missed the East coast…but there is always next time.

Central Mosque

Central Mosque

09 – Brunei

We had only two days in Brunei which to be honest was enough. Not a lot to do or see and it wasn’t helped that we couldn’t even have a drink to pass the time. We did however get see their National Park which involved a very funny boat ride in a coffin and a climb up on what can only be described as scaffolding to walk a series of bridges high above the trees…a fantastic sight but not very in keeping with the jungle. The food wasn’t very exciting which meant that we ordered in Pizza Hut on both nights we were there. Maybe the Sultan needs to invest a bit more into his restaurant scene.

El Nido sunset

El Nido sunset

10 – Philippines

With some of the best beaches and views I can remember, the Philippines will definitely be somewhere we will visit again. In fact we have already checked prices for 2014. EL Nido was simply stunning, and the diving in Malapascua out of this world. A definite highlight was diving with Thresher sharks and snorkeling with Whale sharks. The Philippines did see Katy have a mini breakdown though when she decided that she needed a holiday. It didn’t last long, especially once she had a beer in her hand and watched yet another amazing sunset.

Gili Air

Gili Air

11 – Indonesia

We have many highlights from Indonesia; the amazing diving, hunting for Komodo dragons in Flores, climbing the volcano Mt Bromo and relaxing on the beaches of the Gili islands. Bali was disappointing as it was far too touristy and Jakarta was just a massive concrete jungle. Some of the rooms we stayed in were basic to say the least, with sinks and throne toilets nowhere to be seen. It’s a big place and we barely touched the sides, so we’re definitely thinking of going back for another look some day.

Malaysian Tapir

Malaysian Tapir

12 – Singapore

Singapore was very expensive and saw us stay in our first dorm room of the trip. It’s a big city, pretty easy to get around but not really that much to see. We did venture to the zoo though where I got to see my favourite animal…a Malaysian tapir. Being on a budget we didn’t get to experience much of the glamorous side of Singapore and settled for street restaurants and the odd happy hour beer. It is a place that I could quite easily see us moving to, as there is a great expat community…and the weather is slightly better than the UK.

Sensoji Temple area, Asakusa

Sensoji Temple area, Asakusa

13 – Japan

So Japan beats Singapore hands down for being the most expensive country we visited…£12 for a pint of beer…enough said. The tube and rail network in Tokyo is immense and took some getting used to but we managed to take in most of the sights. The restaurant scene wasn’t that easy; secretive and expensive so we ate our fair share of pot noodles that week and of course squeezed in as much sushi as we could.

Sea lion

Sea lion

14 – Ecuador

Ecuador saw us swimming with sea lions in the Galapagos, climbing volcanoes, whale watching, learning Spanish (sort of) and watching a very uneventful European cup. We visited South America’s largest handicraft market which was the start of Katy’s alpaca addiction. We ate our fair share of almuerzos…a set 2 or 3 course lunch for $2-3 and tried our first of many empanadas. Our real low light of Ecuador was having our camera stolen on a bus near the Peru border.

Diving in Tayrona National Park

Diving in Tayrona National Park

15 – Colombia

Colombia was a nice surprise. We were expecting it to be bit dodgy but the people couldn’t have been friendlier and they couldn’t have put any more police on the streets if they tried. The big cities of Medillion and Bogota were average (we do tend to prefer places out of the city) but the real highlight for us was the Caribbean coast, particularly Cartagena and Tayrona National Park. We really enjoyed San Agustin where I rode a horse the first time and visited the ancient statues scattered across the countryside.

A room with a view

A room with a view

16 – Peru

Peru started badly with us getting mugged in Mancora. It took us a while to shake off the experience and probably ruined our time in Peru if we’re honest. It wasn’t all bad though as we enjoyed sand boarding in the desert, driving through the Andes, climbing Wanapicchu at the top of Machu Picchu. Our first half an hour on Machu Picchu was wonderfully quiet, serene and beautiful but it soon became overcrowded and just another disappointing tourist attraction. The food was pretty good and we became quite adventurous trying cuy (guinea pig), alpaca, Llama and ceviche.

Salt Flat Sunset

Salt Flat Sunset

17 – Bolivia

What a beautiful and extremely diverse country. We visited the highest city in the world, fished for piranhas and swam with pink dolphins in the Amazon, hunted for anacondas and capybaras in the jungle, rode horses across Bolivia’s wild-west and spent three days visiting the amazing salt flats. We had some of the best food in South America, especially the saltenas (empanadas) and enjoyed some very nice (and cheap) Bolivian red wine. The only downside was that we didn’t see a sloth.

View from Cerro Santa Lucía

View from Cerro Santa Lucía

18 – Chile

Arriving on a National holiday wasn’t the best start (you’d think we would have learnt by this point of the trip) and meant that we stayed in some very average hostels. Chile for us meant civilisation after being in basic Bolivia for a month so we took advantage of the wines (of course), being able to choose what and where to eat and paying for things with a credit card (a real novelty). We were there out of season so the snow had melted and the coast was just too cold.

Fitz Roy

Fitz Roy

19 – Argentina

What’s not to love about Argentina…amazing wines, steaks, beautiful scenery and the friendliest people we met in South America. A real highlight for us was of course the wines but Patagonia was simply stunning. Our walk across the Perito Mereno glazier was incredible and an experience we will never forget. Katy even enjoyed our trek to Fitz Roy. It’s another huge country with so much diversity. Patagonia although expensive was worth every penny. We had five weeks in Argentina, and that just wasn’t enough.

Just another beach

Just another beach

20 – Uruguay

Punta Del Diablo although out of season was a great place for us to chill out for a few days. We enjoyed walking in the national park and along the extremely long beaches (we won’t mention the cows as Katy is still having nightmares), some home cooked meals (not that we had a choice with all of the restaurants closed) and catching a little sun along the way. It was a place that I am glad we stopped in. We really enjoyed our time there, although I’m not sure we would go out of our way to visit there again.

Caipirinhas

Caipirinhas

21 – Brazil

As Brazil was our last stop, we treated ourselves to several nice hostels, meals and private transfers. The food was a real highlight, especially the rodizios (all you can eat meat buffets) and of course we drank our fair share of caipirinhas too. Florianopolis was beautiful and we really enjoyed chilling out there for a few days. Iguassu Falls was incredible and we especially enjoyed the Brazilian side. Rio was a great city to end our 15 months away and we celebrated with visits to the many sights including a very interesting Favella tour, a couple of Lapa street parties and of course many more caipirinhas along the way.


So there you have it. We want to thank everyone we met whilst away; you helped to make this an amazing trip for us and it wouldn’t have been the same without you. If any of you are ever in London, make sure you get in contact.

We also want to thank everyone at home for reading the blog and keeping up with our exploits. The blog has done really well with over 70,000 hits in over 115 countries. We even won a best photo of the week competition along the way.

World Blog Coverage

World Blog Coverage

So you don’t have to hear from us anymore. You’ll just have to buy us a drink when you next see us to welcome us home. I am still unemployed after all.

Until the next time…

Her name was Lola, she was a showgirl…

We arrived in Rio de Janeiro excited but slightly apprehensive as it was our last stop before flying home. We didn’t get too much time to dwell on it though as when we walked into our hostel we bumped into some friends from Bolivia, Chris and Zoe. It was their last night travelling before their return to England, so we had a few caipirinhas with them before they left. Our hostel (Bossa in Rio) was really nice and had a great happy hour, so we quickly made some new friends while acclimatising to the sweltering hot weather.

View from our hostel

View from our hostel

We were in Rio for five days but had a lot to squeeze in during that time, so the next morning we were up early and headed to see one of the big attractions, Christ the Redeemer. We went with an Aussie couple called Nathan and Kate. Christ reminded us of Big Buddha in Hong Kong and although it’s a very impressive and symbolic sight, it was the views that won us over. As with all these sights, it was full of tourists but we managed to elbow some of them out of our way for some great shots of Rio.

Christ the Redeemer

Christ the Redeemer

The afternoon was spent wondering around Leblon and Ipanema, some of Rio’s more affluent neighbourhoods. We had planned to watch the sunset from Ipanema beach as apparently it is amazing but unfortunately after about half an hour of watching the beautiful people on the beach, the weather suddenly turned and huge rain clouds came over ahead. We ran for a bus in the pouring rain and made the most of our hostels happy hour instead.

The bad weather continued the next day so we took a walk to the Santa Teresa steps, beautifully tiled stairway by a Chilean artist. It was raining so we took a few pictures and had a quick lunch before heading out for the afternoon.

Santa Teresa steps

Santa Teresa steps

We had booked ourselves onto a favela tour with a tour group called ‘Don’t be a Gringo, be a Local’…quite apt. I was really looking forward to having a walk around a favela within the relative safety of a tour. We were taken to the biggest and most famous favela in South America called Rochina which houses over 69,000 people. We started at the top which provided amazing views over the whole favela and Rio and then slowly made our way down through the narrow lanes.

Rocinha Favela

Rocinha Favela

On our way down we were treated to some live Samba by some of the local kids. They were part of a Sunday school and had been encouraged to do something for money rather than just beg so they had put together a small band…if you can call it that…some old plastic tubs and saucepans. Some of the younger kids joined in and started dancing for us. It was all very sweet and obviously planned for our visit so we rewarded their efforts with a small donation.

Samba

Samba

The favela is like a city of its own, it has its own hospitals, schools, shops and even internet cafes. This particular favela has not been pacified yet but is starting to go through the process. Most of the favelas in Rio have now been pacified, which basically means that the drug lords have been kicked out and they are now run and supported by the police. Most favelas have seen massive improvements in terms of sanitation and some have cable cars or lifts being built (not for tourists but for the locals).

Rocinha Favela

Rocinha Favela

When we came out of a particular bad lane, having walked through sewage and god knows what else, we were greeted by four massive police men carrying machine guns…not a sight I expected but apparently all part of the pacification. Our guide told us that the majority of local people have welcomed the change and are working with the police to improve their living conditions. It was a truly interesting experience.

Rocinha Favela

Rocinha Favela

The Aussie couple we met, Kate and Nathan were great fun and one night Nathan let us into a big secret. He had arranged for Kate’s sister to fly into Rio and travel with them for three weeks and Kate had no idea. Alice was arriving during happy hour so we settled down for a few drinks and when she walked through the door, Kate’s face was a picture…what a brilliant surprise!

We celebrated Alice’s arrival by heading out to the infamous Lapa street party. The whole neighbourhood came alive with live music on the streets, cheap caipirinhas and an amazing atmosphere. We watched some of the locals strut their stuff and show off their samba skills and I decided to have a go. Well, I can tell you that samba is one of the hardest dances I have ever tried. It obviously has a rhythm but I couldn’t find it so I sort of jumped around on my feet trying to wiggle my bum at the same time…not a pretty sight according to Sam!

Lapa Street Party

Lapa Street Party

It was a great night and we managed to come home with our camera and wallet still intact. One of the couples we were with had their iPhone stolen from their pocket unfortunately, and it’s notorious for theft and muggings.

Lapa Street Party

Lapa Street Party

Feeling slightly worse for wear the next day we headed to Copacabana for a walk along the famous beach and possibly a dip in the sea. Unfortunately the weather didn’t co-operate so we settled some lunch followed by some Havaiana shopping much to Sam’s delight. We returned to Lapa later that night for some more samba and the strongest caipirinhas I have ever had. They were served in pint glasses and were very cheap.

Copacabana Beach

Copacabana Beach

Sunday was a bit of a wash-out unfortunately…two nights out on the trot were taking their toll so we had a lazy day in the hostel. By the evening we were feeling much better so a group of us headed out to a local restaurant which was recommended by our hostel; Bar Do Maneiro. It was a great little place which offered traditional Brazilian food at a reasonable price. We each shared some bean and meat stew, which we later found out was made with pigs ears, tails and other meat delights. It was delicious though and I am glad I didn’t really know what I was eating. We also ordered the fish stew which was delicious and we couldn’t resist ordering a plate of crackling…Mmm. It was a great last night for us.

Bar Do Maneiro

Bar Do Maneiro

We packed our bag for the very last time, careful to protect the three litres of cacacha we’re bringing back and headed out to our final tourist spot, Sugar Loaf Mountain. We had wanted to go up for sunset as the views over Rio looked incredible. Because of the changeable weather this wasn’t possible so we headed out around lunchtime and had a couple of hours soaking in the amazing views, even finding a couple of loungers to relax on.  We also enjoyed watching the planes come in as they have to bank quite sharply over the water in order to land on the short runway of the local airport.

View from Sugarloaf Mountain

View from Sugarloaf Mountain

Although we had a lovely day, trying to get Sam to smile in any of the photos was hard work. He is definitely not looking forward to coming home so he was a bit miserable all day. I had fun though and even though I wish we could continue our travels together, I am excited to be coming home to see all my family and friends.

Sugarloaf Mountain

Sugarloaf Mountain

What a city and country to end our 15 months of travel…a definite must see for you all and one that we’ll be coming back to. We’re now at Frankfurt airport waiting for our flight to London and the only thing that is keeping us going (apart from a Starbucks coffee) is the thought of eating bratwurst and ordering some champagne!

Coming soon…the round-up of our trip

Having a Grande time in Brazil

After two flights, a quick bus ride through Rio and a further five hours on a bus we were finally in Paraty; just another ordinary travel day. We’d been told that Paraty was a must see and we were not disappointed. It is a picturesque seaside town with cobble stones, colonial buildings and has hundreds of surrounding islands.

Paraty streets

Paraty streets

We booked a boat tour of the islands for one of our three days and had a great day taking in the various islands and beaches. Being typical travellers, we opted out of the lunch option on the boat (v expensive) so instead enjoyed our packet of peanuts and beer whilst everyone else on the boat tucked into fresh shrimp and salad…it wasn’t our best decision.

Paraty boat trip

Paraty boat trip

The rest of our time in Paraty was either spent on the beach, walking around taking pictures of the beautiful cobble stoned streets or drinking Caipirinhas…when in Rome! Paraty is one of two places in Brazil that produces cacacha, the spirit used to make the famous Caipirinha. We found a Cacacharia and immediately started sampling the local stuff which is so much nicer than the cheap cacacha you see everywhere else.

Beer O Clock

Beer O Clock

We could have stayed longer in Paraty but we’d booked our transfer out and our next stop was Ilha Grande, a beautiful island that has been in our plans since the beginning. As this is our last few weeks, we decided that we were done with buses so booked a transfer which would take us door to door for the remainder of our trip, including Rio. The boat dropped us right in front of our hostel on the island and we were excited to dump our bags and start exploring.

View from our room

View from our room

The hostel (Aquario Hostel) was a bit of a let-down unfortunately. We had a nice room, overlooking the sea front but the staff were a bit moody and the whole place just felt a bit shabby and dirty. Oh well, Ilha Grande is a big island so we spent our days out on the various beaches and our evenings in town doing you know what…drinking caipirinhas.

Happy Hour

Happy Hour

On our first night we met another English couple, Laura and Philip and we decided to book a boat trip together. We chose a smaller boat (max 15 people) which took us to a couple of beaches, a couple of snorkelling sites and included a BBQ lunch.

The beer man

The beer man

The only disappointment that day was that there was nowhere to buy drinks so all we had was warm water. That was until a local man in is kayak arrived with iced cold beers just as we were about to sit down for lunch. Talk about timing.

A relaxed Sam

A relaxed Sam

One of the main things to do on this island is a beach called Lopes Mendes. Everyone we had met told us that we must make the effort to go to this beach. There are two options; the first is to walk there and what they describe as a relatively easy 2-3 hour trek, the second option is to get a boat there.

Jungle boogie

Jungle boogie

As we were in holiday mode, we had discussed getting the boat there and back but then I woke up one morning and it was fairly cloudy and I had one of my moments of madness and suggested that we should walk there. I have never sweated so much in my life. Sam kept telling me was a good thing but I just kept wishing we had paid the £10 and got the boat.

Beach number one

Beach number one

The walk started badly as we took a wrong turn and ended up walking an hour in the wrong direction. Once we were back on track it took us a further 2 ½ hours of fairly tough climbs in incredible heat…not what I would call relatively easy. Sensible as ever, we walked it in our flip flops!

The walk took us through some quite thick jungle but then opened up onto smaller beaches along the way. When we finally reached Lopes Mendes it was really busy but we could see why it was a must see. A beautiful white sandy beach as far as the eye could see stretched out in front of us and this was one of the best beaches we have seen in South America.

Lopes Mendes

Lopes Mendes

Unfortunately the weather wasn’t great so the pictures do not do it justice at all. We found spot to collapse onto, grabbed a couple of beers and just relaxed for a few hours watching the surfers. Of course we got the boat back and we ended the day slowly sailing back to the main town.

Poser

Poser

Our last day on Ilha Grande was spent on the beach, fearing this would be our last beach day for some time we sweated our way through it. It was so hot that we were constantly in and out of the sea, playing frisbee and I think Sam walked up and down the beach about 20 times as it was too hot to lie still. Sounds terrible I know. Last stop Rio.

Caipirinhas

Caipirinhas

As always, in case you’re interested, there are more images available via the RSS feed on the blog, or via the following link:

Until the next time…

Wonder-fall Iguaçu

We spent nine days in Florianopolis, but we left wishing we had more time there. It was such a great place to relax and enjoy some sun that we didn’t really get to explore the island that much. We weren’t too discouraged however as we had more exciting things on the horizon.

After a short five hour bus journey, we found ourselves in Curitiba. It’s a city two hours from the coast that we were using as a brief stop-over before getting a flight two days later. We didn’t have much time and the hostel recommended a city tour on an open top bus…not really our thing but she somehow managed to persuade us it would be a good idea.

Curitiba Botanical Gardens

Curitiba Botanical Gardens

We started the tour with a quick trip the botanical gardens… not much to say about the gardens other than it’s a pretty place with a big greenhouse (or crystal palace) in the middle. After a brief walk around the park, we boarded the linha tourismo to begin our tour of the city.

Now I’m no expert when it comes to these buses, but it really wasn’t that great. Katy had been telling me that we would have headphones with an English speaking guide to talk us through the sites. We also thought we would be able to get on and off when we wanted if we saw anything of interest along the way. What we actually got was no headphones, a pretty poor route map and we were allowed only four stops along the way. Undeterred we tried to keep track of the sites by reading our leaflet which thankfully had an English translation.

Colonial Curitiba

Colonial Curitiba

All in all the tour was average, but we did get to see a lot of the city. Curitiba is a fairly nice looking city with lots of very expensive areas but there was nothing that stood out as a must see. The historical centre had lots of nice colonial architecture and churches, but after six months of seeing this in South America it all becomes a bit of a blur. It’s similar to seeing temples in Asia…after a while they all look the same.

The next day we were back on a plane to visit one of the seven natural wonders of the world, Iguazu Falls. The falls are situated on the border of Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina, but we were starting on the Brazil side in Foz do Iguaçu.

First class travel

First class travel

The flight was a bit comical, as the spaces between the seats were so small that I struggled to even sit down. The air stewardess just laughed at me as I tried to wedge my legs in. On the bus into town Katy kept on saying to me that she could smell soy sauce…I just thought the heat was getting to her. When we arrived at the hostel, we soon realised where the smell was coming from, and it was not good news. For the past two weeks I had been carrying around a bottle of soy sauce for Katy’s home cooked delights, and this had come open in my back-pack and covered half of my clothes. Most of the sauce had eventually soaked into the sleeping bag that I have carried around for 15 months and only used twice (now in the bin). On the bright side my bag is looking half empty now.

That evening we went to a Rodizio restaurant, which is a Brazilian style steakhouse. We helped ourselves to some salads and sides, and then a precession of waiters began to bring us meat…lots of meat, non-stop for about two hours. There were over 32 different types and cuts of meat to choose from, and we just didn’t know when to stop…so we didn’t  We tried pork, beef, rabbit, chicken and about ten different cuts of beef. But the meal finished on a high (for Katy anyway) when the waiter brought a full joint of pork with a huge bit of crackling on the side. She said “don’t bother with the meat; just give me the crackling”…in her best Portuguese obviously. It was a huge meal that was finished off with home-made ice cream.

Iguaçu Falls

Iguaçu Falls

We were up early the next morning with a meat hangover for our first visit to the falls. Originally we had wanted to do the Brazil side first, but our flight times the previous day changed so we didn’t have time. We decided to take a tour as it supposedly made it much quicker and easier to cross the border to Argentina. We had also been told that we could just get dropped off and make our own way around the various trekking routes at the falls and meet the group later for our lift back into town.

What actually happened was it took us nearly three hours to cross the border, which included a half hour stop whilst our tour guide disappeared with our passports into his friend’s house (to photocopy them no doubt). When we did eventually arrive at the park we were told that we had to stay with him. He refused to give us a meeting point, and when Katy kicked up a bit of a fuss about it he was quite rude to her in front of the whole group. As you can imagine this didn’t go down well at all.    

Iguazu Falls

Iguazu Falls

Our first stop in the park was Garganta del Diablo (the Devil’s throat), a walkway which takes you over the river and above the falls…amazing. We had to get a small train to the start of the trail and were accompanied by thousands of butterflies along the way. The walkway ended right above the main waterfall and I am sure our pictures do not do it justice but the sheer size of the waterfall let alone the thunderous sound it made was just incredible.

Stumble and Fall

Stumble and Fall

We got covered in the waterfalls spray which made it hard to take a decent picture and we also had to elbow quite a few other tourists out of the way but it was such a spectacular sight as tonnes of water per second pours over the cliffs and the mist rises amongst the jungle. They are taller than Niagara Falls, and twice as wide. Numerous islands along the 2.7km edge divide the falls into about 275 separate waterfalls, varying between 60 to 82 metres.

All Fall Down

All Fall Down

We continued our tour of the falls by following the upper and then lower trails each giving a very different perspective of the falls. We opted out of the boat trip which actually took you under the falls but it did look amazing and a lot of fun.

Piti-fall

Piti-fall

After a long day in the searing sun, we made our way back to our hostel still on the Argentinian side to meet our friend Candy that we met in Florianopolis. We enjoyed dinner and drinks and compared notes on our falls experience so far.

Delight-fall

Delight-fall

The following day we got on a bus for another trip to the falls, this time on the Brazil side. Most people try and see the falls from both sides as each side offers a very different view and experience. We’d been told that the Brazilian side was not as good but we were really looking forward to exploring this side especially as we were tour guide free.

Wonder-fall

Wonder-fall

It was another really sunny day, and thankfully the walkways through the jungle were much quieter and more relaxing then Argentina. It probably helped that we were not being herded around in a group, but we immediately preferred this side of the falls. The views were amazing, although you aren’t quite as close as you are in Argentina. We spent a few hours slowly making our way along the path until we reached Garganta do Diablo, this time on a walkway in front of it rather than above it.

Plenti-fall

Plenti-fall

As with most attractions like this, the experience is slightly tainted by the amount of people you are competing for space with. It was the same at Angkor Wat and various other places we’ve visited. This is just the price you pay for visiting such a unique attraction. Perhaps we planned badly and shouldn’t have visited on a Saturday…perhaps we shouldn’t have got a tour guide? At the end of the day it was well worth the effort to see the falls and we got to tick off our fourth natural wonder of the world.

Free Fall

Free Fall

With just a few weeks left we’re headed for the beach and trying hard not to think about cold and rainy London.

As always, in case you’re interested, there are more images available via the RSS feed on the blog, or via the following link:

Until the next time…

Brazil…the beginning of the end

From Uruguay we travelled across the border to Brazil with three lovely (and mad) Irish girls, Maeve, Cliona and Mary, who we’d met in our hostel. The journey started with a bit of drama…Cliona had left one of her bags at the bus station containing hundreds of dollars, and it was unlocked…oh. After some tears, frantic phone calls and a very helpful local lady at the border, she was eventually reunited with her bag seconds before we had to leave on our connecting bus (lucky).  Disaster averted. This was our last overnight bus (whoop!) so we thought we’d travel in style and treated ourselves to cama seats (full recliners). Once on board we sat back, relaxed and enjoyed a dinner of dry chicken and plastic tortilla.

After a good night’s sleep we were finally in Brazil…our last country of this trip and which takes the tally up to 21 visited in 15 months. We were both really excited about Brazil as we had heard such good things from fellow travellers. However a depressing thought was at the back of our minds…just four weeks until we have return to a cold and rainy London.

Hostel views

Hostel views

A few weeks before Brazil we decided that we wanted a stress free month so we booked as much in advance as we could including hostels, transfers, buses and any flights we may need…more time for the beach. Our first stop in Brazil was Florianopolis (or Floripa as the locals call it), a large island with over 40 beaches, famous for its amazing surf and a chilled out vibe.

Barra de Lagoa

Barra de Lagoa

Happy with our hostel choice, we quickly admired the sea view from our window and headed out to explore the small fishing village of Barra de Lagoa. We were starving after our 14 hour bus ride so treated ourselves to an amazing seafood lunch, prawns three ways; breaded, in garlic and grilled, fish in a prawn sauce and crab cakes. It was great to be eating fish again after all the red meat in Argentina.

Mmmmm, seafood

Mmmmm, seafood

It was still a bit out of season so for the first few days we pretty much had a beach to ourselves…it was heaven. In the evenings the hostel offered free caipirinhas in the bar which were delicious and a great way to meet people or just admire the amazing view from the balcony.

View from our room

View from our room

The Irish girls were staying in a different hostel so we arranged to meet them on the beach for Sam’s birthday. They had bought him a Brazilian flag sarong which was great and his only birthday present. Before you ask where his present was from me, let me remind you that he spent £150 on a football ticket not so long ago…that was his birthday treat!

Girl's night out...and Sam

Girl’s night out…and Sam

In the evening we headed out for another delicious seafood dinner and Sam got to enjoy his birthday with four lovely ladies. We ended the night in an English bar called the Black Swan and were joined by a few more people…more girls, one of which asked Sam if I was for keeps (rude). I evidently had far too many caipirinhas as I can’t remember a thing, but I do believe Sam said that I was.

The next few days were pretty chilled out and involved applying sun tan lotion, playing frisbee, eating acai berry smoothies and relaxing in the hostel bar. I have to say the acai berry things have been a real highlight…they are absolutely delicious and apparently very healthy (bonus). They blend frozen acai pulp with bananas and serve it with chopped bananas and granola on the top…it’s like a frozen yogurt type thing and makes a great (and cheap) alternative to lunch…see…healthy!

Acai

Acai

We discovered (well Sam actually) that the Black Swan would be showing the Arsenal match on the Saturday so of course it was decided that we would go into town and watch it. What a dull game it turned out to be but luckily the rugby was on at the same time which kept us more entertained. After a few buckets of beer we headed back to our hostel and straight to bed…what lightweights we have become.

Our hostel was always very busy with lots of people coming and going and we got chatting to a couple of Irish lads, Tom and Darra and an English girl called Candy and immediately hit it off. We spent our last few days and nights hanging out with them and even had a mini beach party when the Irish girls joined us for their last night.

Beach party

Beach party

Florianopolis was a fabulous start to Brazil…we’re tanned, healthier (thanks to the acai) and really looking forward to seeing more of Brazil.

As always, in case you’re interested, there are more images available via the RSS feed on the blog, or via the following link:

Until the next time…

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