Wine(ding) our way through Chile

The flight to Santiago although late, passed without incident. We had arranged an airport pick-up from our hostel, and it felt like a very civilised way to travel. A hell of a lot better than the alternative of a twenty four hour bus journey anyway. Santiago is a very European looking city, and after a few days in the most basic of accommodation in Bolivia, it was nice to get some home comforts back.

View from Cerro Santa Lucía

View from Cerro Santa Lucía

We spent our days exploring the city, and taking in as many free attractions as we could. It’s an expensive place to be, so reigning in Katy’s spending habits was taking more effort than usual. We saved money by cooking more of our own meals (well Katy more than me), and sticking to a few wines at the hostel rather than beers at a bar. The wine here is cheap. For £3 you can get a good bottle of red or white, and this is actually becoming quite dangerous. I’ve drunk more wine in the last two months than ever, and with Argentina coming next I don’t see that slowing down.

After a few days we decided to head to Valparaiso on the coast for some sun. It’s only about two hours away from Santiago, and very close to the beach town of Viña del Mar. Our plans were slightly thwarted though as on arrival the temperature dropped, and we were left with a very overcast looking coastline. So instead we got comfortable in our warm room, with some home cooked meals and some more Chilean wine.

Main Square Valparaiso

Main Square Valparaiso

As the weather didn’t get any better over the next couple of days, we decided that we had to explore, bad weather or not. Someone had recommended a free walking tour, so we thought it might be a good way to get to know the city. Valparaiso was once a major port and one of the richest cities in South America, before the Panama Canal opened. Since then it has fallen on bad times, and so there are many amazing colonial buildings which have been left to rot.

Funiculars

Funiculars

Most of the houses are built into the surrounding very steep hills. Instead of struggling to walk up and down these hills every day, they built funiculars, or cliff railways. There are not many that are still running in the city, but it is still a preferred way of getting up the hills.

The other thing that Valparaiso is famous for is the street art, or graffiti. It is so common there that people actually pay artists to paint the front of their houses. There is an unwritten rule that you cannot tag over someone else’s art. Therefore getting your house painted prevents any other unwanted graffiti. It makes Valparaiso a very colourful place, and there are some amazing pieces around the city.

Taking street art to the next step

Taking street art to the next step

While we were there we also visited Viña del Mar. It is only ten minutes away by metro, and is a nice beach town. You can see how this place gets packed in the summer, but with the weather being cold and overcast it was practically a ghost town. There are lots of nice looking bars and restaurants, all of which looked out of our price range. Instead we headed back to Valparaiso for dinner in a traditional restaurant that had been recommended to us. We had a great night with a local band playing old school Chilean songs. We were the only gringos in the place, so we got a few strange looks, but everyone was very welcoming. Katy managed to start flirting with a fireman, and after paying for a raffle ticket, she even got to wear his hat.

Where's the fire

Where’s the fire

It was typical that on the day that we decided to return to Santiago the weather picked up and the sun was shining. We checked into a different hostel that was cheaper and which offered free breakfast and dinner. It wasn’t the nicest place, but for the price we had a bargain.

Our Chilean friends that we met in San Pedro De Attacama, Francisco and Penelope, had invited us to their house, so we headed over there for Sunday lunch. We had a really good afternoon, with a few glasses of wine and some great food. I was surprised when Katy (who isn’t exactly a dog lover) fell in love with their toy poodle, Pasha. She even threatened to kidnap her, but that may have been the wine talking.

Chilean friends

Chilean friends

Before we left Chile, Katy said that it was imperative that we visit at least one vineyard, so that’s exactly what we did. It was actually quite expensive, but who am I to argue with a girl with a wine craving. We had a private car to take us one hour out of town to visit the Undurraga Vineyard.

Undurraga Vineyard

Undurraga Vineyard

We were taking the tour with Louise from Australia, who had just arrived at our hostel. The grounds were really nice, and luckily the sun had come out which made a big difference. Our guide explained the whole wine making process and the differences between the different grapes.

Almost ready for drinking

Almost ready for drinking

We spent an hour being shown around the site, including the cellars and the fermenting areas. We finished with a small tasting of four wines. The servings were conservative (in my opinion) but it was good to taste different varieties. The big let-down was the fact that there was no wine bar on site, and no food served with the wine…maybe a good thing considering our shrinking budget.

More barrels

More barrels

To make up for this, we decided to go for a local Chilean drink in the centre of Santiago. A Terremoto (or earthquake) is a combination of fermented homemade white wine, grenadine and pineapple ice cream. It sounds a bit strange, but people don’t really drink this for its taste. It’s called an ‘earthquake’ as it leaves your legs shaking afterwards. Katy and I had already tried one of these previously in the same bar, and it was as local as they come. It’s called La Piojera and I would definitely recommend it to anyone visiting Santiago.

Terremoto

Terremoto

We were the only gringos in there, and we were treated to some special attention. We even had the local musicians serenading the girls…it must be the blonde hair. It was a great end to our time in Chile, and a day that I’m sure we may regret tomorrow morning when we get our early bus to Argentina.

The centre of attention

The centre of attention

As always, in case you’re interested, there are more images available via the RSS feed on the blog, or via the following link:

Until the next time…

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About Sam Thompson

Currently taking a break from everything and travelling around the world. For how long, who knows.

Posted on 03/10/2012, in Chile and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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