Monkeying around in Borneo

On our last night in KL we got caught in a torrential down pour which supposedly got rid of the mosquitoes. Wrong. After an uncomfortable night’s sleep due to the heat, I woke up with about 50 mosquito bites on each leg so I wasn’t feeling very peachy. Still we were on our way to Borneo so things weren’t all that bad.

Kuching sunset

Kuching sunset

We got a nice surprise in Kuching when we checked into our hostel. It was basically a three bedroom apartment with a lounge and kitchen. We had booked a private room (the other two being dorm rooms) and found that we were the only ones staying there, so for three nights we had a sofa to lounge around on, a small kitchen to chill out in and for the first time in six months it felt a little like home. All for just £9 per night.

Kuching is a small city in the Sarawak province of Borneo and we were surprised at how modern it was. We had a walk around the centre and along the river front where we witnessed some really weird storm clouds. We were about to go on a boat trip down the river before it absolutely chucked it down. Instead we sheltered in a nearby café and enjoyed some iced coffees whilst deciding what to do with our two days. We decided on Bako National Park and the Semenggoh Orang-utan sanctuary.

Proboscis monkey

Proboscis monkey

So the next day we made our way to Bako National Park. After a later than planned start we found the bus we needed and were eventually on our way at 10am. The bus took about an hour followed by a twenty minute hair raising boat trip to the entrance of the park. We registered at the main office (in case you get lost) and then saw a Proboscis monkey hanging around in a tree. For those who don’t know, the Proboscis monkey has a big nose and I think they’re pretty cool, although Sam thinks I look like one; RUDE!

We then started on the Lintang Trail which was 6km and would apparently take 3.5 hours to complete. We were immediately taken aback by the beauty of the rain forest with the trail mainly being roots and climbs over fallen trees. It was nice to feel like you were actually trekking through the jungle rather than walking on manmade trails. After a steep climb and scorching midday heat, we were pleased to find some flatter terrain and cool breezes near the top. I think I even jokingly said ‘I wish it would rain’. Not a joking matter it turns out.

A bit wet

A bit wet

The heavens opened and we got absolutely soaked, the trails turned into rivers and we still had about 4km to go. At first I didn’t find it very funny until suddenly out of nowhere a man wearing only his white see-through Y- fronts came passed and mumbled something about it being very wet. I wish we had had the camera ready as it would have made a brilliant photo but none the less it cheered me up. Once I had got over being wet I enjoyed the rest of the walk.

We made it back in time for a quick drink and a walk down the beach before catching the boat back to the bus. And whilst we sat on the air conditioned bus absolutely soaked and freezing cold, the semi naked man had got into his nice dry clothes and looked very smug about it. Who had the last laugh there then? We ended the day with pot noodles laid out on the sofa whilst we watched a film.

The next day we were up and ready to go by 7am as we needed to catch an early bus to the Orang-utans so as not to miss their feeding time. We’d been told to get there early before all the big tour buses and to stay on after the tour buses had gone for a chance to see Richie, the big alpha male.

Richie, the alpha male

Richie, the alpha-male

Just hanging around

Just hanging around

When we arrived, Richie was already out eating a ton of bananas but we were told he wasn’t in a very good mood, so we had to hang back until it was safe to go closer. We probably saw about twenty orang-utans that morning swinging from the trees, playing and eating their breakfast. It was an amazing experience to see them up close and I think we took about 300 pictures in the end.

We were back into town in time for lunch where we enjoyed some delicious Kolo mee (BBQ pork and noodles) and dumplings from the local Chinese food stalls. As it was our four year anniversary we treated ourselves to a local speciality, layer cake and enjoyed a large slice of blueberry and chocolate cake with a mug of coffee. I would have preferred a bottle of red wine but Sam said we couldn’t afford it L

The next day we left Kuching and took a flight to Kota Kinabalu in the Sabah province of Borneo. We hadn’t originally planned to spend any time here but this is where my friend Lucy and family are staying so we squeezed in a couple of days to see them. We’d always planned to go into Brunei and found cheap flights from KK, so after one night there we met Lucy for a quick cup of tea before heading off to Brunei.

 Omar Ali Saifuddien Mosque

Omar Ali Saifuddien Mosque

I didn’t know what to expect from Brunei. We’d heard mixed reviews about the place and a lot of people had said there wasn’t much to see, so we were a bit apprehensive and worried if two nights was going to be too long. The first thing we had to do was find a hostel, as we’d looked online but they all seemed so expensive so we decided to chance it and just turn up. Unfortunately Brunei is not the sort of place where you should just turn up as there are very few hotels to choose from (especially in our budget). We managed to find a travel agent at the airport who was able to help us with a couple of options and call through for availability. After a 1km trek down the highway we found the bus stop and we were on our way into Bandar Seri.

We eventually booked into KH Soon rest house which was a bit of a dump but the cheapest we could find (£22 per night). The first thing that struck us about Brunei is how clean and quiet it was. We had a walk around, watched the sun set over the Omar Ali Saifuddien Mosque and enjoyed a take away pizza whilst watching a film on the laptop. There is a serious lack of entertainment mainly due to the fact that it’s a dry country so the usual bars and cafes don’t exist.

Ulu Temburong National Park

Ulu Temburong National Park

The next day we went to Brunei’s Ulu Temburong National Park and the only way to get there was by boat which was a trip in itself. The boat (locally known as a flying coffin) took us along winding rivers and rapids with amazing rainforest views. We finally ended up at the National Park’s entrance, registered and began the steep climb of roughly 2000 steps up to the canopy walkway.The walk itself wasn’t actually too bad (a sign I am getting fitter maybe) and the canopy wasn’t quite what we expected. I think we both thought of a rope type bridge through the forest but instead we were faced with purpose built scaffolding structure which consisted of ten towers with bridges linking them. Not quite in keeping with the beautiful rainforest but the views from the top made it all seem worthwhile. Although I am not sure they were meant to lean as much they did in the wind, and the spirit levels on the top were a bit of a worry. After we had finished our walk along the tree tops we were taken to see a waterfall with the promise of a swim but when we got there it was barely deep enough to paddle.

Kota Kinabalu seafood court

Kota Kinabalu seafood court

We flew back to Kota Kinabalu the next day and had arranged to meet Lucy and co in the local seafood food court for dinner. The kids (and Tom) were fascinated by all the fish in the tanks including eels, prawns and crabs and then we had the difficult decision of what to eat.  In the end we had a kilo of prawns in soy and garlic sauce (delicious), chilli seawater crab, soft-shell crab, steamed red snapper, Singapore noodles and fried rice. Far too much food for all of us but we just about managed.

The next day we had arranged to meet them all on an island nearby for a day of sunbathing and snorkelling. They were going from their hotel in the marina and we took the budget route on a public boat. It was a great day even though Sam got a little burnt (he’ll never learn) and the kids had a great time swimming and snorkelling in the sea.

Mamutik Island

Mamutik Island

We waved them all off on their boat around 4pm and waited for our lift back to the mainland when the heavens opened. At first it wasn’t too bad but about five minutes into the trip we couldn’t see further than about 1m so we had no idea of where land was and the rain was so heavy and sharp that I started to get a little bit worried. To make matters worse, we had a crazy boat driver driving really fast into the storm whilst shouting random things and his friend practicing what looked like Tai Chi on the back. I couldn’t even see at this point as there was just too much rain and I had visions of the boat getting lost at sea. All Sam could do was just laugh uncontrollably.  We finally saw land and I began to breathe again…disaster averted.

After saying goodbye to Lucy and everyone this morning we had a brief flight to Clark Airport in the Philippines. We now have a five hour wait in probably one of the worst airports we’ve been to before we fly to Cebu. Borneo is definitely somewhere that we would like to come back to, and we feel that we didn’t have enough time here. It’s somewhere we would highly recommend, especially the West coast.

As always, in case you’re interested, there are more images available via the RSS feed on the blog, or via the following link:

Until the next time…

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Posted on 05/04/2012, in Borneo and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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